otipemsiw:

assangistan:

MUST SEE

via hick-ups:

A photograph from the 1870’s showing tens of thousands of bison skulls. They were mass slaughtered by the U.S. Army to make room for cattle and force Native American tribes into starvation.

[bolding mine]

Mass slaughter of buffalo and bison took place in Canadian territory as well, and was part of a deliberate campaign to break Indigenous resistance to (further) settler incursions onto Native land and the railroad.  The removal of the buffalo also meant that when it came time to sign treaties, the Canadian government could more or less set any terms it saw fit and Indigenous leaders basically had to comply with them or their people would freeze and starve (that’s if gov officials even bothered to translate the actual terms of the treaty at all).

The “disappearance” of the buffalo is narrativized as part of a larger myth surrounding the “disappearing Indian” whose absence clears the land for the incoming white pioneers to take their place.  The murder, destruction, slaughter of bison and buffalo was a tactic essential to the genocidal colonial project. 

nikolinakujaca:

130186:

Ana Locking Fall 2014

Want one!!!

"

Olivia, my eldest daughter, caught measles when she was seven years old. As the illness took its usual course I can remember reading to her often in bed and not feeling particularly alarmed about it. Then one morning, when she was well on the road to recovery, I was sitting on her bed showing her how to fashion little animals out of coloured pipe-cleaners, and when it came to her turn to make one herself, I noticed that her fingers and her mind were not working together and she couldn’t do anything.

“Are you feeling all right?” I asked her.

“I feel all sleepy, ” she said.

In an hour, she was unconscious. In twelve hours she was dead.

The measles had turned into a terrible thing called measles encephalitis and there was nothing the doctors could do to save her.

That was twenty-four years ago in 1962, but even now, if a child with measles happens to develop the same deadly reaction from measles as Olivia did, there would still be nothing the doctors could do to help her.

On the other hand, there is today something that parents can do to make sure that this sort of tragedy does not happen to a child of theirs. They can insist that their child is immunised against measles. I was unable to do that for Olivia in 1962 because in those days a reliable measles vaccine had not been discovered. Today a good and safe vaccine is available to every family and all you have to do is to ask your doctor to administer it.

It is not yet generally accepted that measles can be a dangerous illness.

Believe me, it is. In my opinion parents who now refuse to have their children immunised are putting the lives of those children at risk.

In America, where measles immunisation is compulsory, measles like smallpox, has been virtually wiped out.

Here in Britain, because so many parents refuse, either out of obstinacy or ignorance or fear, to allow their children to be immunised, we still have a hundred thousand cases of measles every year.

Out of those, more than 10,000 will suffer side effects of one kind or another.

At least 10,000 will develop ear or chest infections.

About 20 will die.

LET THAT SINK IN.

Every year around 20 children will die in Britain from measles.

So what about the risks that your children will run from being immunised?

They are almost non-existent. Listen to this. In a district of around 300,000 people, there will be only one child every 250 years who will develop serious side effects from measles immunisation! That is about a million to one chance. I should think there would be more chance of your child choking to death on a chocolate bar than of becoming seriously ill from a measles immunisation.

So what on earth are you worrying about?

It really is almost a crime to allow your child to go unimmunised.

"

Roald Dahl, 1986

(via brain-confetti)

TEAM VACCINE

(via watchoutfordinosaurs)

NINETEEN EIGHTY SIX.

roald dahl was calling out the anti-vaccination movement as self indulgent bullshit //thirty god damn years ago//.

(via ultralaser)

Over 1,000 preventable deaths and 128,000 preventable illnesses since 2007 and counting

And this is only in recent history. I can’t imagine the numbers if we had data all the way back to 1986.

(via autistiel)

And thanks to anti-vaxxers, measles is back in the United States.

(via thebicker)

Wonder if green hair is obligatory in the “JOKER STILE” barbershop

archiemcphee:

English artist Craig Davison creates series of paintings that beautifully illustrate the awesome power of childhood imagination and our limitless ability to play pretend as our favorite movie characters. He draws from a wide variety of movies, but the pieces seen here all revolve around Star Wars.
Kids play their hearts in the foreground while their shadows loom larger than life in the background as the fictional characters they’re pretending to be. Tree branches have become light sabers, cardboard tubes and a hair dryer work equally well as blasters, a garbage can and a colander are all you need to be R2-D2 and C3PO, and a pair of headphones serve as Princess Leia’s cinnamon bun hairdo.
Visit Craig Davison’s website to check out more of his delightful and nostalgic artwork. Then go grab a tree branch and meet us at the park for a light saber duel.
[via Nerd Approved]
archiemcphee:

English artist Craig Davison creates series of paintings that beautifully illustrate the awesome power of childhood imagination and our limitless ability to play pretend as our favorite movie characters. He draws from a wide variety of movies, but the pieces seen here all revolve around Star Wars.
Kids play their hearts in the foreground while their shadows loom larger than life in the background as the fictional characters they’re pretending to be. Tree branches have become light sabers, cardboard tubes and a hair dryer work equally well as blasters, a garbage can and a colander are all you need to be R2-D2 and C3PO, and a pair of headphones serve as Princess Leia’s cinnamon bun hairdo.
Visit Craig Davison’s website to check out more of his delightful and nostalgic artwork. Then go grab a tree branch and meet us at the park for a light saber duel.
[via Nerd Approved]
archiemcphee:

English artist Craig Davison creates series of paintings that beautifully illustrate the awesome power of childhood imagination and our limitless ability to play pretend as our favorite movie characters. He draws from a wide variety of movies, but the pieces seen here all revolve around Star Wars.
Kids play their hearts in the foreground while their shadows loom larger than life in the background as the fictional characters they’re pretending to be. Tree branches have become light sabers, cardboard tubes and a hair dryer work equally well as blasters, a garbage can and a colander are all you need to be R2-D2 and C3PO, and a pair of headphones serve as Princess Leia’s cinnamon bun hairdo.
Visit Craig Davison’s website to check out more of his delightful and nostalgic artwork. Then go grab a tree branch and meet us at the park for a light saber duel.
[via Nerd Approved]
archiemcphee:

English artist Craig Davison creates series of paintings that beautifully illustrate the awesome power of childhood imagination and our limitless ability to play pretend as our favorite movie characters. He draws from a wide variety of movies, but the pieces seen here all revolve around Star Wars.
Kids play their hearts in the foreground while their shadows loom larger than life in the background as the fictional characters they’re pretending to be. Tree branches have become light sabers, cardboard tubes and a hair dryer work equally well as blasters, a garbage can and a colander are all you need to be R2-D2 and C3PO, and a pair of headphones serve as Princess Leia’s cinnamon bun hairdo.
Visit Craig Davison’s website to check out more of his delightful and nostalgic artwork. Then go grab a tree branch and meet us at the park for a light saber duel.
[via Nerd Approved]
archiemcphee:

English artist Craig Davison creates series of paintings that beautifully illustrate the awesome power of childhood imagination and our limitless ability to play pretend as our favorite movie characters. He draws from a wide variety of movies, but the pieces seen here all revolve around Star Wars.
Kids play their hearts in the foreground while their shadows loom larger than life in the background as the fictional characters they’re pretending to be. Tree branches have become light sabers, cardboard tubes and a hair dryer work equally well as blasters, a garbage can and a colander are all you need to be R2-D2 and C3PO, and a pair of headphones serve as Princess Leia’s cinnamon bun hairdo.
Visit Craig Davison’s website to check out more of his delightful and nostalgic artwork. Then go grab a tree branch and meet us at the park for a light saber duel.
[via Nerd Approved]
archiemcphee:

English artist Craig Davison creates series of paintings that beautifully illustrate the awesome power of childhood imagination and our limitless ability to play pretend as our favorite movie characters. He draws from a wide variety of movies, but the pieces seen here all revolve around Star Wars.
Kids play their hearts in the foreground while their shadows loom larger than life in the background as the fictional characters they’re pretending to be. Tree branches have become light sabers, cardboard tubes and a hair dryer work equally well as blasters, a garbage can and a colander are all you need to be R2-D2 and C3PO, and a pair of headphones serve as Princess Leia’s cinnamon bun hairdo.
Visit Craig Davison’s website to check out more of his delightful and nostalgic artwork. Then go grab a tree branch and meet us at the park for a light saber duel.
[via Nerd Approved]
archiemcphee:

English artist Craig Davison creates series of paintings that beautifully illustrate the awesome power of childhood imagination and our limitless ability to play pretend as our favorite movie characters. He draws from a wide variety of movies, but the pieces seen here all revolve around Star Wars.
Kids play their hearts in the foreground while their shadows loom larger than life in the background as the fictional characters they’re pretending to be. Tree branches have become light sabers, cardboard tubes and a hair dryer work equally well as blasters, a garbage can and a colander are all you need to be R2-D2 and C3PO, and a pair of headphones serve as Princess Leia’s cinnamon bun hairdo.
Visit Craig Davison’s website to check out more of his delightful and nostalgic artwork. Then go grab a tree branch and meet us at the park for a light saber duel.
[via Nerd Approved]

archiemcphee:

English artist Craig Davison creates series of paintings that beautifully illustrate the awesome power of childhood imagination and our limitless ability to play pretend as our favorite movie characters. He draws from a wide variety of movies, but the pieces seen here all revolve around Star Wars.

Kids play their hearts in the foreground while their shadows loom larger than life in the background as the fictional characters they’re pretending to be. Tree branches have become light sabers, cardboard tubes and a hair dryer work equally well as blasters, a garbage can and a colander are all you need to be R2-D2 and C3PO, and a pair of headphones serve as Princess Leia’s cinnamon bun hairdo.

Visit Craig Davison’s website to check out more of his delightful and nostalgic artwork. Then go grab a tree branch and meet us at the park for a light saber duel.

[via Nerd Approved]

smithsonianmag:

via fastcodesign:

What Happens When An Ex-NASA Engineer Drops Paint Into Fish Tanks
Artist Kim Keever drops industrial paint tints into 200-gallon fish tanks, and photographs the swirling, ballooning colors as they mix and disperse through the water for his series “Across The Volumes.” 
More> Co.Design

smithsonianmag:

via fastcodesign:

What Happens When An Ex-NASA Engineer Drops Paint Into Fish Tanks
Artist Kim Keever drops industrial paint tints into 200-gallon fish tanks, and photographs the swirling, ballooning colors as they mix and disperse through the water for his series “Across The Volumes.” 
More> Co.Design

smithsonianmag:

via fastcodesign:

What Happens When An Ex-NASA Engineer Drops Paint Into Fish Tanks
Artist Kim Keever drops industrial paint tints into 200-gallon fish tanks, and photographs the swirling, ballooning colors as they mix and disperse through the water for his series “Across The Volumes.” 
More> Co.Design

smithsonianmag:

via fastcodesign:

What Happens When An Ex-NASA Engineer Drops Paint Into Fish Tanks
Artist Kim Keever drops industrial paint tints into 200-gallon fish tanks, and photographs the swirling, ballooning colors as they mix and disperse through the water for his series “Across The Volumes.” 
More> Co.Design

smithsonianmag:

via fastcodesign:

What Happens When An Ex-NASA Engineer Drops Paint Into Fish Tanks
Artist Kim Keever drops industrial paint tints into 200-gallon fish tanks, and photographs the swirling, ballooning colors as they mix and disperse through the water for his series “Across The Volumes.” 
More> Co.Design

smithsonianmag:

via fastcodesign:

What Happens When An Ex-NASA Engineer Drops Paint Into Fish Tanks
Artist Kim Keever drops industrial paint tints into 200-gallon fish tanks, and photographs the swirling, ballooning colors as they mix and disperse through the water for his series “Across The Volumes.” 
More> Co.Design

smithsonianmag:

via fastcodesign:

What Happens When An Ex-NASA Engineer Drops Paint Into Fish Tanks
Artist Kim Keever drops industrial paint tints into 200-gallon fish tanks, and photographs the swirling, ballooning colors as they mix and disperse through the water for his series “Across The Volumes.” 
More> Co.Design

smithsonianmag:

via fastcodesign:

What Happens When An Ex-NASA Engineer Drops Paint Into Fish Tanks
Artist Kim Keever drops industrial paint tints into 200-gallon fish tanks, and photographs the swirling, ballooning colors as they mix and disperse through the water for his series “Across The Volumes.” 
More> Co.Design

smithsonianmag:

via fastcodesign:

What Happens When An Ex-NASA Engineer Drops Paint Into Fish Tanks

Artist Kim Keever drops industrial paint tints into 200-gallon fish tanks, and photographs the swirling, ballooning colors as they mix and disperse through the water for his series “Across The Volumes.” 

More> Co.Design

jtotheizzoe:

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

Art like this makes me happy.

This’d be a great gift for my mum. jtotheizzoe:

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

Art like this makes me happy.

This’d be a great gift for my mum. jtotheizzoe:

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

Art like this makes me happy.

This’d be a great gift for my mum. jtotheizzoe:

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

Art like this makes me happy.

This’d be a great gift for my mum. jtotheizzoe:

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

Art like this makes me happy.

This’d be a great gift for my mum. jtotheizzoe:

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

Art like this makes me happy.

This’d be a great gift for my mum. jtotheizzoe:

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

Art like this makes me happy.

This’d be a great gift for my mum.

jtotheizzoe:

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine

We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.

A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 

Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio

- Lee Jones

Art like this makes me happy.

This’d be a great gift for my mum.

This week’s #nails #nailart

explore-blog:

For your daily dose of dystopia, a visual guide to Shakespeare’s tragedies, where everybody dies, by Caitlin Griffin. Best thing since those pictogram-infographic summaries of famous lives

Also see Star Wars reimagined as a Shakespearean tragedy

( Coudal)

archiemcphee:

New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously featured here) recently traveled to Hawaii where he created more of his awesome abstract, geometric sandcastles. They’re an impressive and tantalizing distraction for those of us still surrounded by wintry weather.
Click here to view more of Calvin Siebert’s recent sand sculptures.
[via Colossal] archiemcphee:

New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously featured here) recently traveled to Hawaii where he created more of his awesome abstract, geometric sandcastles. They’re an impressive and tantalizing distraction for those of us still surrounded by wintry weather.
Click here to view more of Calvin Siebert’s recent sand sculptures.
[via Colossal] archiemcphee:

New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously featured here) recently traveled to Hawaii where he created more of his awesome abstract, geometric sandcastles. They’re an impressive and tantalizing distraction for those of us still surrounded by wintry weather.
Click here to view more of Calvin Siebert’s recent sand sculptures.
[via Colossal] archiemcphee:

New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously featured here) recently traveled to Hawaii where he created more of his awesome abstract, geometric sandcastles. They’re an impressive and tantalizing distraction for those of us still surrounded by wintry weather.
Click here to view more of Calvin Siebert’s recent sand sculptures.
[via Colossal] archiemcphee:

New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously featured here) recently traveled to Hawaii where he created more of his awesome abstract, geometric sandcastles. They’re an impressive and tantalizing distraction for those of us still surrounded by wintry weather.
Click here to view more of Calvin Siebert’s recent sand sculptures.
[via Colossal] archiemcphee:

New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously featured here) recently traveled to Hawaii where he created more of his awesome abstract, geometric sandcastles. They’re an impressive and tantalizing distraction for those of us still surrounded by wintry weather.
Click here to view more of Calvin Siebert’s recent sand sculptures.
[via Colossal] archiemcphee:

New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously featured here) recently traveled to Hawaii where he created more of his awesome abstract, geometric sandcastles. They’re an impressive and tantalizing distraction for those of us still surrounded by wintry weather.
Click here to view more of Calvin Siebert’s recent sand sculptures.
[via Colossal] archiemcphee:

New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously featured here) recently traveled to Hawaii where he created more of his awesome abstract, geometric sandcastles. They’re an impressive and tantalizing distraction for those of us still surrounded by wintry weather.
Click here to view more of Calvin Siebert’s recent sand sculptures.
[via Colossal]

archiemcphee:

New York-based sandcastle artist Calvin Seibert (previously featured here) recently traveled to Hawaii where he created more of his awesome abstract, geometric sandcastles. They’re an impressive and tantalizing distraction for those of us still surrounded by wintry weather.

Click here to view more of Calvin Siebert’s recent sand sculptures.

[via Colossal]

lady-of-the-flowerrs:

I wish it snowed where I live.

lady-of-the-flowerrs:

I wish it snowed where I live.

#kratovo